Teach martial arts to your kids with videos! SERIOUSLY?

While searching online for inspiration on a topic for this week’s blog I got sidetracked by a particular article with advice how to teach martial arts to your kids. It caught my attention because our own karate school has produced online videos as a part of our curriculum. The article turned out to be an advertisement for videos to assist parents in teaching martial arts to their kids. SERIOUSLY?

First things first

The first question to ask yourself before taking on this endeavor is why do you want your child to learn martial arts in the first place? For some people it is simply a means of physical activity at home. Keeping kids moving is important, especially if they have been sitting most of the day.

In most cases, though, it is because either your child has expressed an interest or because the parent has an interest! It could be due to bullying or poor self-esteem. You might think a little self-defense training could help. Or your reasoning might have to do with poor attention skills. After all, martial arts is great for building focus, right? Yes, it can be, and here’s a great article to explain why that is true. But the most important reason for success in any of these areas is having a great martial arts teacher. You are probably a great parent, but are you a great martial arts teacher?

Your kids deserve the best teacher

An experienced martial artist is the person who should be teaching martial arts to your child. From a technical point of view, there is no one better. Years of experience are behind each kick and punch, and there has likely been thousands of kicks and punches thrown. Professional martial artists sometimes get a bad rap. After all, it is extremely physical and can appear to be aggressive. ( Not!) Understanding the comprehension necessary to execute particular techniques, or the cognitive skills required for quick decision-making, will make a parent appreciate the need for a professional to teach your child.

Where you live will determine the availability of a martial arts professional. Read this to help you ask the right questions when considering martial arts classes for your child.

It’s the journey, not the destination

That is so cliche I never thought I would actually use it. Guess what? It’s a cliche for a reason; it’s so true! In my 20+ years in the martial arts I have had some of the best experiences of my life. I can remember my very first class – the trepidation and excitement of it all. Eventually making friends and lifelong relationships, we were all training with a common purpose. We received direction from a teacher, our Sensei, who knew each of our strengths and weaknesses. Karate classes became my “happy place”.

Learning self-defense, gaining self-confidence, improving focus and attention span and having a physical outlet are great reasons for your child to learn martial arts. However, likely the best reason a parent should let a professional martial artists teach their child is to give their child the opportunity for a most memorable journey!

Links to our student’s journeys

Below are a few links to our Student Spotlight feature of our blog. Kids, teens and adults share their thoughts on their training!

Student Spotlight 36 Student Spotlight 31 Student Spotlight 6/27/2018

Student Spotlight No. 38

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

This week’s spotlight is on Nereo!

Nereo is 28 years old, is a chef and recently achieved blue belt at The Bushido School of Karate. He began his training with us in January 2019.

Nereo got started because he was watching his step-daughter take classes. He tried it for one month – like all new students do – and has been training in our adult classes for 6-months. Our $99 monthly tuition for parents of students was also a great deciding factor. Nereo is getting a great work-out and sharing in a family activity with his step-daughter.

Training at Bushido Karate makes me stronger, and feel more confident.

– Nereo
Spotlight on Nereo!
June 26, 2019

Student Spotlight No. 37

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

This week’s spotlight is on Matthew!

Matthew is 8 years old, is in 2nd grade and is a blue belt at The Bushido School of Karate. He began his training with us in July 2018.

Bushido Karate makes me feel: happy.

My favorite part of class is: (learning) blue belt form.

What is the best thing you like about training at Bushido Karate?: I like wood breaking!

– Matthew

I enrolled my son in Bushido Karate for the discipline.

-Matthew’s mom
young boy in karate gi posing with smile
Spotlight on Matthew!
June 20th, 2019

Are all black belts instructors? Part 1

The quick answer to the question “are all black belts instructors?” is maybe. An easier question to answer is “are all black belts teachers?”. That’s a hard no because there are differences between teachers and instructors.

The differences between teachers and instructors

For the sake of argument, let’s say that all teachers are instructors, but not all instructors are teachers.

The instructor

Think about all the different types of instruction you have received throughout your life. The short list includes tying your shoes, getting dressed, riding a bike, swim lessons, balancing a checkbook, cooking a meal, driving a car and changing a diaper. Most of those scenarios involve one person showing another person, or people, how to get from point A to point B.

You will encounter instructors throughout your life. Many times, however, the word instructor is used synonymously with the word teacher. You may have been told that the individual standing in the front of the martial arts class and wearing a black belt is your teacher. If he or she is in charge of the class then he or she is definitely an instructor. Not necessarily a teacher.

To make it even more confusing, many martial arts disciplines, like The Bushido School of Karate, use terms like Shihan, Sensei, Deshi and Sempai. Those titles and their definitions will be the topic of Part 2 of “Are all black belts instructors?”, so stay tuned!

The teacher

Let’s go back to the list of instructors you’ve had in your life. Any one of them could have been easily replaced with another instructor. That is the difference between an instructor and a teacher. Teachers cannot easily be replaced.

Teachers make the effort to know each student’s strengths and weaknesses. They push you out of your comfort zone and care about your progress. Realistically, a student who holds a green belt (intermediate level) in karate could instruct a white belt (beginner level). When the instructor becomes vested in the student’s success and can impart the wisdom received only through their own trials and tribulations, the instructor becomes the teacher. And then…

The teacher becomes a student

By learning how to teach effectively, the teacher becomes a student of his or her own students, or karateka. Teachers are humble enough to be willing to continue to learn, especially from those they are teaching! Understanding and embracing this is the difference between an instructor and a teacher.

Some black belts are instructors, some are not, and some are teachers!

I hope I have successfully explained why the statement “some black belts are instructors, some are not, and some are teachers” makes sense. Earning a black belt means you have passed a series of requirements. It does not mean you are now a teacher, or even an instructor, although sometimes those requirements may involve instructing or assistant-instructing in classes.

In order for a black belt to be a teacher, he or she ultimately has to be willing to learn from the newest of students. It’s a journey worth taking!

Stay tuned for “Are all black belts instructors? Part 2”

Student Spotlight No. 36

You can always come home again

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

This week’s spotlight is on Juliana!

Juliana is 24 years old, is in her last year of law school and is training for her 2nd degree black belt. She began her journey at Bushido Karate in January 2000. She is the youngest of three – all Bushido Karate students and all black belts. Juliana is a great asset to Bushido Karate and a power of example for both younger and older students. When she came back after a long absence we were thrilled to have her return – like coming home again!

I received my black belt 12 years ago and shortly thereafter stopped training. As a returning student, now 24 years old, I have realized one of the best aspects of training at Bushido is the constant self-improvement. I believe there are always ways to better oneself, whether it be academically, physically or emotionally. Today I box, I am training for my my second degree and I am studying for my final exams of law school. I have Bushido to thank for my accomplishments and am grateful for having been welcome back with open arms.

– Juliana
Adult female karate student in uniform
Spotlight on Juliana!
May 22, 2019

It’s Women’s Health Week, and some things have changed ladies!

The guidelines for how women should take care of their health has changed ladies. I am sharing this quick video segment which aired May 15th 2019, on Hoda and Jenna’s Today show hour.

Did I hear that right?

Did I hear that right? Did she really say women should no longer perform self-checks for breast cancer? I listened and re-listened. Yes, she did say that. I think the hosts were just as perplexed as I was!

Upon hearing that I had to do some research of my own. Granted, it was not thorough and relied solely on what Google would deliver to the first page after searching “newest guidelines for womens health”. But I believe many, if not most health care providers are not aware of this new information. In fact, this is what I was able to find from the Cleveland Clinic, and you can clearly read that self-exam’s are still recommended.

So now what are we supposed to do?

Old information collides with new information; what are we supposed to do? The days of blindly following what a health-care professional recommends should be long gone – I hope. You should not believe one or the other based on a) this short video segment nor b) what is provided by the Cleveland Clinic in a quick PDF file about women’s health.

YOU need to be your own advocate. YOU need to ask questions and compare the information. YOU need to be as comfortable as possible making your own decisions based on the many streams of information available. Unfortunately, some of what you uncover will be outdated and just wrong. That’s why you need good relationships with everyone on your health care team. You have a right to be heard and listened to. And you have a right to ask questions – it’s YOUR health!

You can’t take care of anyone else if you don’t take care of yourself!