student spotlight banner

Students of Bushido Karate

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

The spotlight is on Adriana!

Adriana is 8 years old, is in 2nd grade and is currently a yellow belt at The Bushido School of Karate. She began her training with us in August 2018.

Bushido Karate makes me feel: strong My favorite part of class is: learning the yellow belt form I like to learn: kicks and punches

– Adriana, age 8

(The best thing about training at The Bushido School of Karate) is the discipline they teach; they have a lot of fun. Adriana is always happy and ready for her classes. (We chose Bushido Karate ) first for the flexibility of the schedule and for the good recommendations. As parents we are very happy that our children love the classes. We think it is an excellent school!

– Adriana’s mom
Student spotlight is on Adriana
March 11th, 2020

Students of Bushido Karate

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

The spotlight is on Kaiden!

Kaiden is 6 years old, is in 1st grade and is currently a yellow belt at The Bushido School of Karate. He began his training with us in July 2016 in our Little Eagles Martial Arts® program. Kaiden graduated into our Kid’s Beginner Karate program in November 2017 and has been moving up ever since!

Bushido Karate makes me feel: strong My favorite part of class is: games I like to learn: kicks

– Kaiden, age 6
young karate student balancing on a ball
Kaiden was a Little Eagle’s student in April 2017

We joined the Bushido Karate family 4 years ago when Kaiden was 2 years old. I remember the first time we visited Sempai Burrell and Sensei Schwartz made us feel so welcomed. The staff has always been so positive and alre always challenging Kaiden to become his best version and we love that!

Training at Bushido Karate has been an amazing experience. From the moment Kaiden started in Little Eagles with Sensei Schwartz we have seen tremendous growth. Kaiden is now a confident, disciplined little boy!

– Kaiden’s mom
Spotlight on Kaiden
February 26, 2020
woman martial artist stretching

Why stretching is (still) important for weight loss and exercise

There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding the value – or lack thereof – of muscle stretching to accelerate recovery after exercise. “Stretching clears out your lactic acid,” and other similar claims abound. Is any of this true?

Sort of.

First, it is important to understand the difference between stretching for recovery and stretching for remodeling.

Recovery

During exercise, muscles are called upon to work. During this work, fuel is used up, waste products are created and muscle fiber structure is disrupted by multiple micro tears. Imagine a banquet, for comparison, during which the food is eaten, garbage is accumulated (napkins, chicken bones, etc.), and the table settings disrupted. Before the next banquet, the food needs to be restocked, the garbage cleared, and the tables reset.

For muscles, this process of resetting for the next event is called recovery. The muscle is returned to full function without soreness.

This is not the process that leads to body change per se, but it is important for athletes who wish to compete at their highest level multiple times during a short period.

Athletes have tried many things to speed up recovery: cryotherapy, massage, compression, ice water immersion, stretching, hyperbaric oxygen, anti-inflammatories and electromyostimulation, just to name a few. These interventions are aimed at decreasing lactic acid, inflammatory markers and other molecules that build up following intense exercise.

Of these, only massage is consistently effective. Multiple studies have shown that stretching does not aid significantly in waste removal or serve in any capacity to accelerate muscle recovery.

Remodeling

Most of us aren’t training for professional competitions, though, but are exercising to be healthy, lose weight and improve our moods.

For that, we need to focus on our body’s remodeling response to exercise, which is not the same as recovery from exercise.

Plainly said, when we exercise consistently, our bodies adapt to that stressor by changing our muscle structure, metabolism and physiology. It is that change, that remodeling, that leads to all the positive benefits of exercise. To stick with our banquet example, if we realized that 500 people are going to show up at every event, but we only have 10 tables set at present, we would change our capacity to be ready for the next event. We would increase the efficiency in the kitchen and set more tables. Likewise, our body remodels itself to adapt to increasing exercise.

Many studies also have been conducted to determine how to optimize the body’s remodeling response to exercise. After 35-plus years of study, six variables emerge as consistently aiding the body in its effort to reorganize in response to exercise: timing of nutritional intake (specifically protein), type of exercise, massage, sleep, low-dose creatine and – you guessed it – stretching.

Perhaps the most well-known and accepted benefits of muscle stretching exercises are improved or maintained range of motion, or both; alignment of bones and joints; and strengthening of connective tissues – all elements that optimize performance. Many studies have shown that flexibility training (dedicated attention over time to muscle stretching as part of an exercise program) directly improves muscle function, and ultrasound images have documented favorable alterations in muscle architecture following weeks of regular stretching, such as longer fibers. What’s more, a recent study has clearly shown that stretching over time improves blood flow to the muscles during subsequent exercise in animals.

Prior negative commentary around muscle stretching may be misleading to the casual observer. It is true that studies have shown static stretching routines (reach, hold for 30 seconds, release, next stretch) prior to a workout or competition lead to decreases in strength during that event, and that stretching before activity does not prevent injuries, as was long thought. But these are very specific circumstances that don’t apply to most people.

So do I stretch or not?

If you are an elite athlete trying to decrease injury, increase strength or accelerate muscle recovery right before your next event – then no.

If you are most people, exercising to lose weight, be well and improve mood – then yes. It will help with muscle remodeling, connective tissue strengthening, range-of-motion improvement, joint alignment and potentially blood flow during subsequent exercise – all beneficial effects in the long run.

Written by David Prologo and originally published on TheConversation.com

Links for your consideration

Martial Arts Fitness

Martial Arts Fitness Series1, Episode 2

adult karate student with face hidden

Student Spotlight No. 39

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

This week’s spotlight is on Scott!

Scott is 39 years old, is a commercial real estate broker and is currently a blue belt at The Bushido School of Karate. He began his training with us in July 2018.

The attention to detail and intensity brought to every class pushes me to focus more and try harder. Also, this martial arts style is very practical. It is unusual for the master of the school to teach every class (like Shihan does), and that sets the tone for a great training experience.

– Scott
Spotlight on Scott
July 19, 2019
adult martial artist behind question mark

Student Spotlight No. 38

Who is in the spotlight this week?

The Bushido School of Karate is so appreciative of the students and families that are a part of our Bushido Karate family. We’ve had the pleasure of teaching for over 2 decades and in that time have been privileged to teach thousands of students. Everyone started at the beginning with no shortcuts, and we are so proud of their accomplishments.  Our weekly Student Spotlight features randomly chosen students on their own journey at The Bushido School of Karate.

This week’s spotlight is on Nereo!

Nereo is 28 years old, is a chef and recently achieved blue belt at The Bushido School of Karate. He began his training with us in January 2019.

Nereo got started because he was watching his step-daughter take classes. He tried it for one month – like all new students do – and has been training in our adult classes for 6-months. Our $99 monthly tuition for parents of students was also a great deciding factor. Nereo is getting a great work-out and sharing in a family activity with his step-daughter.

Training at Bushido Karate makes me stronger, and feel more confident.

– Nereo
Spotlight on Nereo!
June 26, 2019
national women's health week logo

It’s Women’s Health Week, and some things have changed ladies!

The guidelines for how women should take care of their health has changed ladies. I am sharing this quick video segment which aired May 15th 2019, on Hoda and Jenna’s Today show hour.

Did I hear that right?

Did I hear that right? Did she really say women should no longer perform self-checks for breast cancer? I listened and re-listened. Yes, she did say that. I think the hosts were just as perplexed as I was!

Upon hearing that I had to do some research of my own. Granted, it was not thorough and relied solely on what Google would deliver to the first page after searching “newest guidelines for womens health”. But I believe many, if not most health care providers are not aware of this new information. In fact, this is what I was able to find from the Cleveland Clinic, and you can clearly read that self-exam’s are still recommended.

So now what are we supposed to do?

Old information collides with new information; what are we supposed to do? The days of blindly following what a health-care professional recommends should be long gone – I hope. You should not believe one or the other based on a) this short video segment nor b) what is provided by the Cleveland Clinic in a quick PDF file about women’s health.

YOU need to be your own advocate. YOU need to ask questions and compare the information. YOU need to be as comfortable as possible making your own decisions based on the many streams of information available. Unfortunately, some of what you uncover will be outdated and just wrong. That’s why you need good relationships with everyone on your health care team. You have a right to be heard and listened to. And you have a right to ask questions – it’s YOUR health!

You can’t take care of anyone else if you don’t take care of yourself!